Articles about Suboxone and Opioid Addiction

Feeling dizzy from an opioid overdose

Can Suboxone make you high?

Suboxone is a medication that contains a potent opioid drug. If you don't use this drug responsibly you can experience some very dangerous situations. Suboxone can, indeed, be severely intoxicating, and if you’re not careful, you could end up in the hospital. Learn more.


Methadone in a cup

Methadone vs Suboxone

Each medication has its own benefits and downsides. Before choosing which medication you think will be best for you, it’s important that you understand how each of them work and what precautions you need to take when using them. Learn more.


An opioid overdose

What to do during an opioid overdose

Opioid overdoses are a very serious situation and, if untreated, can easily result in death. It’s important that you understand how opiates work in the body so you can figure out what to do in the unfortunate situation of an overdose. By the time you’re finished this article, you should be educated enough to save someone from an overdose, should it ever happen. Learn more.


Oxycodone opioid pills

What is an opioid?

There are many different opioid drugs, though they all function in a similar manner. Today we’re going to explain exactly what opioids are, how they work, and the kind of precautions that you’ll need to take when using opioid pain medication. Learn more.


Methadone poured into a cup

What is Methadone?

Methadone can be a lifesaver for people struggling with addictions to opioids, particularly those who struggle with illegal opioids. However, it’s important to know that methadone comes with its own set of dangers and risks. We’ve written this article to educate you about the benefits of methadone and the steps you can take to avoid any dangerous repercussions. Learn more.


Suboxone withdrawal depression

What is Suboxone withdrawal like?

All opioid medications come with a risk of withdrawal after extended use. Opioid withdrawal is not a pleasant experience, but with the right knowledge and preparation, you can minimize the discomfort of withdrawal. This article is intended to help you understand Suboxone withdrawal and hopefully ease you through the process of quitting the drug. Learn more.


Suboxone patch on the arm

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a brand name for a medication that’s used for opioid maintenance therapy (OMT.) Suboxone has two kinds of medicine in it. Learn more.


Doctor working with a patient

What is the DATA 2000?

The DATA 2000, or the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, was the legislation that allowed opioid medication to be widely prescribed for the treatment of illegal drug addiction. There are still many questions that are raised in regards to this type of treatment, and not all of them have answers that will please everyone. Still, the DATA 2000 has allowed many people access to treatment that they couldn’t receive before. Learn more.


A depressed woman

Can Suboxone Make You Depressed?

Just like with any addiction, there are two phases to the Suboxone dependency: the period during which you’re actually using the drug, and then withdrawal and post-acute withdrawal phase. These two periods can have vastly different effects on a person’s psyche and it’s important to understand the difference between the two stages. Learn more.


A multitude of drugs in hand

Dangerous Suboxone Interactions to Avoid

There are some drugs that should not be used in combination with Suboxone. It’s possible to increase the risk of overdosing on other drugs when you’re using Suboxone, or to increase the chance of unwanted side effects. Learn more.


Weighing on a scale

Does Suboxone Cause Weight Gain or Loss?

Suboxone doesn’t usually cause weight gain on its own. However, it can cause some of the weight-related issues that opioids are known to cause due to the nature of the lifestyle it promotes. Learn more.


Suboxone pills

Does Suboxone have Narcan in it?

There are two active components in Suboxone - an opioid antagonist and an opioid agonist. So why are these two seemingly opposed drugs mixed together in the same pill? To understand this, you should have an understanding of both drugs - and of the business practices of the pharmaceutical industry. Learn more.


Urine for a drug test

Does Suboxone Show up as an Opiate on a Drug Test?

Depending on the type of drug test that you're being given, the test might be able to reveal that you’re taking methadone or suboxone. Certain tests are able to differentiate between different opioids, but these are usually more thorough tests given by medical facilities that test specifically for opioids. Learn more.


A woman sick in bed with withdrawals

Does Suboxone Stop Withdrawals?

In short, yes, but that’s because Suboxone is a very powerful opioid on its own. Buprenorphine is many times stronger than morphine, and the main reason that your withdrawals stop when you take Suboxone is because you’re ingesting another highly potent opioid to saturate your receptors. Learn more.


A hand holding a white pill

Is Zubsolv the same as Suboxone?

Suboxone is the most popular preparation of buprenorphine. It contains not only buprenorphine but a drug known as Naloxone. Zubsolv also contains buprenorphine and Naloxone, so one might think the two drugs are different. To know if they are, you should understand a bit about the two drugs. Learn more.


A mother breastfeeding a baby

Suboxone and Breastfeeding

When you take any drug, it is absorbed by your body and travels through your organs via your circulatory system. It is excreted through your urine, through your blood, and through your breast milk. Learn more.


A man with stomach problems

Suboxone and Stomach Problems

Some opioids are known to cause nausea soon after using them, but this is more common with people who are new to opioids. Typically someone using Suboxone has already had a lot of experience with opioids and has built up a tolerance to these initial effects. Learn more.


The thyroid rendered in 3D

Suboxone and Thyroid Problems

There have not been a lot of studies done specifically on Suboxone’s interaction with the thyroid. However, it is rather well-established that long-term abuse of opioids can cause hyperthyroidism. Since Suboxone is dispensed by a physician, and the doses appear quite low, on wouldn’t think that Suboxone use is considered abuse. However, Suboxone potency (8mg of Suboxone, which is often the standard beginning dose, is equivalent to roughly 64 mg of injected morphine) means that while you’re on Suboxone maintenance, you are consuming equivalent, if not much more, opioids than would be considered abuse if you were using illegal opioids. Learn more.


Suboxone strips next to the Suboxone box

What are Suboxone Strips?

Suboxone strips, also known as Suboxone film, is a form of Suboxone that’s made into easily-dissolved strips that a user places under their tongue. Suboxone film is intended for sublingual absorption because this is the most effective way to absorb the buprenorphine aside from injection. Learn more.


Taking Suboxone in pill form

What Ways Can You Take Suboxone?

Suboxone is available in several forms, and can be taken several ways. The way that you choose to use it may be determined by your doctor or you may be given the choice depending on the type of Suboxone you get prescribed. Learn more.

In Case of a Heroin or Opiate Overdose

Ingesting a large amount or highly potent dose of an opiate such as heroin, either intentionally or accidentally, can lead to serious consequences, including overdose, coma, and/or death.

If you suspect you or someone else has overdosed, call your local emergency hotline (ex. 911) or a poison control center (1-800-222-1222) immediately.

Signs of an opiate overdose

  • Constipation
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Low blood pressure or weak pulse
  • Lack of responsiveness, even to painful stimuli (such as strongly rapping knuckles across the sternum)
  • Pupils that are constricted or non-reactive to light
  • Blue colored fingernails or lips
  • GI tract spasms
  • Difficult to wake up or extreme sedation
  • Coma
  • Seizures
  • Slow, shallow breathing or no breathing at all